April 13, 2018

TNG skants - Men's vs. Women's

Since posting my TNG skant analysis and my examination of a screen-used women’s TNG skant, a fellow known as “Stasiuwong” was kind enough to share some photos of his screen-used men’s TNG skant, so I thought it would be interesting to take a quick look at how it correlates to the women’s version, in terms of construction. 

For the sake of brevity, I’ll rehashing all the aspects that appear to be the same as the women’s skant I examined, and instead simply mention all the details I noticed that are different.

We’ll start with the outer dimensions, then move on to the interior construction, generally making our way from top to bottom. 


I was surprised to see that this men’s skant was only a mere inch longer than the women’s version!
Men's TNG skant
"Stasiuwong" photo of original, screen-used men's TNG skant

I find this curious, since in the show, the women’s version appeared to be quite short – approximately knuckle-length – whereas the men’s version extended down to the mid-thigh or so.

TNG, 1x1 "Encounter at Farpoint"
TNG, 1x9 "The Battle"
TNG, 1x1
"Encounter at Farpoint"
TNG, 1x6
"Where No One Has Gone Before"

One might assume that only shorter men were cast with this particular uniform in mind, but while there were a couple shorter men see in the skants throughout season 1, there were also a couple taller fellows!
TNG, 1x1 "Encounter at Farpoint"

Also, whereas the women’s version had 2” sleeves (measured from the lower, outer corner of the yoke to the sleeve hem, and from the lower armscye/”underarm” seam to the sleeve hem), the men’s sleeves were a bit longer – approximately 4”.

Men's TNG skant
"Stasiuwong" photo of original, screen-used men's TNG skant


Note that the production tag on the yoke is labeled with “39,” which is presumably to indicate the wearer’s size. 

However, also note the tag underneath the arm labeled “40.”

Men's TNG skant
"Stasiuwong" photo of original, screen-used men's TNG skant

After having made several of these, I’ve determined that the ideal wearing ease for a TNG skant seems to be about 1”, so my best guess is that the upper tag indicates a “size 39” and the “40” indicates the garment’s finished chest measurement (which would include 1” of wearing ease). 


Another minor difference is that both the front and back vents on the men’s skant were a bit shorter than those on its female counterpart.

Men's TNG skant
Front vent
("Stasiuwong" photo of original,
screen-used men's TNG skant)
Men's TNG skant
Back vent
("Stasiuwong" photo of original,
screen-used men's TNG skant)


In addition to the dimensional differences, there were also some minor differences in the skant’s interior construction. 

Unlike on the women’s skant I examined, the lower side of the upper/horizontal zipper did not appear to be stitched down onto the lower seam allowance, where it extended past the center front. Both sides were simply left hanging free.

Men's TNG skant
"Stasiuwong" photo of original, screen-used men's TNG skant


Also, on the women’s version, the horizontal zipper only extended past the armscye seam by about 3 ¼”, but on this particular men’s skant, it appeared to be longer – much longer!

Men's TNG skant
"Stasiuwong" photo of original, screen-used men's TNG skant


Interestingly, on this skant, both the front and back “waist anchors” appeared to be hand-tacked to the side front and side back seam allowances, in addition to their outer edges being secured to the side seam allowances.

Men's TNG skant
"Stasiuwong" photo of original, screen-used men's TNG skant
Men's TNG skant
"Stasiuwong" photo of original, screen-used men's TNG skant


The leg straps appear to have been a bit taller on the men’s version – 4 ½”, as opposed to 4" on the women’s version. 

Observe also that, rather than securing via two black snaps, the leg straps on this particular skant did so via black hook-and-loop tape (“Velcro”), which was simply topstitched into place!

Men's TNG skant
"Stasiuwong" photo of original, screen-used TNG skant
Men's TNG skant
"Stasiuwong" photo of original, screen-used TNG skant


And finally, whereas the shoulder pads were actually hand-sewn to the shoulder seam allowances on the women’s TNG skant I examined, on this skant, the shoulder pads appear to have been removable and attached via snaps – more like we saw on most of the modern-era Star Trek costumes.

Men's TNG skant
"Stasiuwong" photo of original, screen-used TNG skant


There are a few more subtle differences between the two skants (men’s and women’s), but I won’t get into them. Those are all the “major” ones. 

Special thanks goes to “Stasiuwong” for all the helpful photos of his skant, and allowing me to share them here on the blog! 

Here’s the full gallery, for your viewing pleasure:

Men's TNG skant
Men's TNG skant
Men's TNG skant
Men's TNG skant
Men's TNG skant
Men's TNG skant
Men's TNG skant


I’m putting the finishing touches on a free sewing tutorial for the TNG skants and hope to have it up next week! 

My (Bad Wolf Costumes) men’s TNG skant pattern should be ready soon, too. 

Subscribe to my “Costume Guide” e-mail newsletter (upper right corner) for updates!


3 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing the details! As a professional costumer I can tell you the reasons for a couple of the construction details on this costume. The use of Velcro and detachable shoulder pads indicate to me that the costume was designed to be used for background characters. Also, zippers tails are often unsecured in costumes. It speeds up construction by eliminating the time to find a specific size, or alter a long zipper to a specific length. (It also can make it easier to start closing the zipper by giving you something to grab.)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the insights!

      With the exception of Deanna in the pilot/finale (and a single shot of Tasha Yar, at the end of the pilot), the skants were always worn by extras/background performers. My guess would be that the Velcro was used simply because it's faster to attach than having to hand-sew snaps.

      Leaving the zipper ends hanging free is a time-honored practice in STAR TREK, and I suspect the upper/horizontal zipper was so long simply because it needed to be, to sufficiently open for the wearer.

      - Alex

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  2. Very curious about your observation of the length of the male costumes according to the screencaps. There's no avoiding this discrepancy. I double-checked my COA; it's labeled "male skant-type." I also found a separate tag for article 422, indicating B39 W35 H40. Perhaps this truly was meant for a shorter person as you suggest, or for a woman with a small bust size?
    Whatever the case, the comparisons and highlights are insightful.

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